Skip to main content

About your Search

20110701
20110731
STATION
CSPAN2 62
LANGUAGE
English 62
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 62 (some duplicates have been removed)
international issues of the day such as our topic for tonight, u.s./pakistan relations. on behalf of the wefpg and our board members who are present tonight, dawn, gayle, donna and teresa, i want to welcome everybody here. we're so glad that you could join us for this behind-the-headlines event. these are events on hot issues in the news, and recently we've done events on egypt, libya, women in the middle east, um, and our event tonight is with ambassador husain haqqani, the pakistani ambassador to the who will be joined by our friend and frequent speaker and moderator, washington post's senior national security correspondent karen deyoung. for a conversation on u.s./pakistan relations. the event could not be more timely, as we all know, given the increased tensions in the relationship between the two countries following the killing of osama bin laden. we're so pleased to have the ambassador with us tonight to explore the complexities and the importance of this relationship and extremely lucky to have karen back. i want to recognize a few guests who are here with us tonight, undersecretary of
post" senior, senior correspondent karen de young for a conversation on u.s.-pakistan relations. the event could not be more timely as we all know, given the increased tensions in the relationship between the two countries following the killing of osama bin laden. we are so pleased to have the ambassador with us tonight to explore the complexities and the importance of this relationship and extremely lucky to have karen back. i want to recognize if you guess who are here with us tonight. undersecretary of state for public diplomacy, judith mchale. [applause] principle deputy assistant secretary for economic energy and business affairs, deborah mccarthy. [applause] members of our corporate advisory council and of course our many ambassadors and diplomatic colleagues who work very closely throughout the years on our embassy events. our next one is going to be in july at the embassy exam the end it will be on african women leaders promoting investment, trade and peace. we are hoping that many of you will be able to join us for this very special event. and now it gives me great plea
and pakistan leads our overall policy efforts and we are supporting his efforts, ambassador grossman's efforts, to develop all of the different elements of our policies. >> tried to get him here but couldn't. >> okay. so, in other words, you aren't in a position really to answer my question? is that what you're saying? >> yes, senator. i would defer to the special representatives office. >> then would you since the question is to you would you get me a written answer to the question? >> i will, sir. >> thank you. mr. harrigan, what are dea's plans for continued operations should military forces draw down to levels that would not allow adequate support for your operations? >> well, again, co-chairman grassley, i have been in discussions really for the last 18 months with my counter part at the podium here, mr. wechsler, as well as our regional director in afghanistan with the u.s. military and si isaf forces. dea has no intention of drawing down any of our 81 personnel. it would be a bit premature to see right now how the drawdown will impact dea but let me assure you we continue to work with t
war, which is iraq, afghanistan, to some extent pakistan, possibly iran. this is the battle the united states is facing. the balance of power in the region, the iran iraqi, the indo-pakistani. each one of them have destabilized over 10 years. in the air of israel relationship, barring some dramatic change in egypt over time, israel is so dominant that it creates new realities on the ground. there's a difference to what the united states really says very often. in afghanistan the united states is asking pakistan to do things that create stability, that will weaken pakistan, that potentially cratered an independent regional power in india, that the united states may not appreciate in the long run. and, of course, the invasion of iraq has destroyed the iraq power, they're forgetting nuclear weapons. iran is the dominant conventional military force in the region. if the united states is there. the united states as its policies to withdraw from iraq, the potential for iran to fill the vacuum is extremely high. that in turn changes the balance of power, orderlies the political dynamic in the
colorado continuing this conversation. up next conversation with pakistan's ambassador to the u.s.. the ambassador talks about the long term strategic relationship between the u.s. and pakistan and the raid on osama bin laden's compound in pakistan. this is moderated by senior national security correspondent for "the washington post" care and de young who stood by the group patricia ellis gives a brief opening remarks. this is an hour and 20 minutes. >> good evening everyone and welcome. i am going to start again. sorry. good evening, everyone, and welcome. i'm patricia less president of the women's foreign policy group. we promote women's leadership and of places pressing international issues of the day such as our topic for tonight, u.s.-pakistan relations. on behalf of the wfpg and board members present tonight, don, gayle, theresa, donna, i want to welcome everybody here. we are so glad that you could join us for this the high end of the headline yvette. these are evens on hot issues in the news and recently we have done a fence on egypt, libya, women in the middle east, and
woman from new york who in 1962 that to pakistan and converted to islam. >> welcome to the 27th annual "chicago tribune" printers row that size. a special thank you tour sponsors. before we begin today's program, please turn off your cell phone and all other electric devices. photographs are not permitted. today's program will be recorded for future broadcast on c-span's booktv. if there is tenet began for a q&a session with the author, we ask you to use the microphone located at the center of the room said the home viewing audience can hear a question. the schedule of when the program will air, go to www.booktv.org. please welcome moderator, it karen long and deborah baker, author of "the convert." [applause] >> good morning. it's wonderful to be here and thank you for joining us. i drove here from cleveland and i was delighted to be occupied with a complex object and engaging biographer. deborah baker seems allergic to the facile answer and drawn to flags that are complicated and eliciting more questions than answers. so if that is your cup of tea, you walked into the great room. bec
brooklyn, new york to karachi, pakistan and then she would move to the horror -- lahore, this is the first of the letters i found at the new york public library, which was my introduction to margaret marcus. may 1962, the hellenic torch. this is posted from alexandria egypt. after all of our goodbyes, after you mother betty and walter walked down the plank and drove off, i was overcome by profound sense of dread. i stood to attack rail for a long time completely stricken. the excitement of the weeks leading up to my departure gone. when the ship pulled away from the brooklyn pier condo late to the city city began to dance in the engine seemed to echo the pounding of my heart, a black and fathomless ocean slowly swallowing everything i own. it takes some time and many prayers before my fear began to subside. so she goes on to tell her parents about the various odd years on board. there is a captain and his great crew who are very suspicious of this journey that she was making to pakistan. mother come you imagine i was going to need men i still dressed for dining and dancing on board as if m
parents on board this ship, a brief crater taking her from new york to pakistan, and from there she moved to lahor. this was the first of the letters i found at the new york public library, which was my introduction to margaret markus. may 1962, the torch. this was posted from egypt. after all our good-byes after you, mother, betty, and walter walked down the gangplank and drove off, i was overcome with dread. i stood at the deck rail for a long time stricken. the excitement. weeks leading to departure gone. when it pulled up, the lights of the city dimmed, it was a black ocean swallowing everything i had ever known. it took some time and many prayers before my fear began to subside. she goes on to tell her parents about the various odd characters on board, and, you know, there's a captain and his greek crew who are very suspicious of her -- this journey that she was making to pakistan. mother, you imagined i was going to need my nice silk dress for dining and dancing on board. i was happy to leave that dress behind with betty, her sister, along with my corset, and my high hills i gave to
and pakistan. we must always be on guard. i am advised this figure is significantly reduced. international forces have been bearing down on al qaeda and the taliban in pakistan and afghanistan. osama bin laden has been killed and al qaeda is significantly weakened. in afghanistan british and international forces have driven al qaeda from its bases and while it is too early to tell for certain initial evidence suggests we halted the momentum of the taliban insurgency in its heartland. mr. speaker, we are entering a new phase in which the afghan forces will do more of the fighting and patrolling and our forces training and mentoring. as president obama said last month the mission is changing from, that to support. when we arrived there was no one to hand over to. no proper army or police. in many places across the country the afghan security forces now stand ready to begin the process of taking over security responsibility. success in afghanistan requires a number of critical steps. the first is making sure the afghan security forces are able to secure their own territory. there have been we
and pakistan. with the help of pakistan. so i think that sometimes we just go from one end of greek allies, great friends which is what was your longtime, in the previous administration, two gosh, these guys are no good, et cetera. this is not the way to do business between two allies and partners. and i think we will not interpret the remarks as a letter. we understand them to be a reflection of american statement of policy, and the americans have the right to defend their homeland by ensuring that terrorists are plotting against the american homeland are dealt with. but as far as the other concern, we are very confident of our sovereignty. we would like to protect our sovereignty. and sovereignty requires that when operations take place in pakistan they should take place without knowledge and our participation. >> a quick follow. does that mean if there's a second rate, that your forces would fire on the rich? >> when i became ambassador to the united states, i went and saw very good colleague of mine, another professor of international, and i said i've been ambassador before but that wa
and military strategy in afghanistan and pakistan. if confirmed, general dempsey, who currently serves as army chief of staff, will succeed admiral mike mahlon who will retire a the end of september. a democrat carl levin chairs the senate armed services committee. >> good morning everybody. the committee meets this morning to consider the nomination ofmo general martin dempsey to bethii chairman of the joint chiefs of staff. it was not long ago that general dempsey came before us for his nomination hearing to become ago chief of staff of the army. we welcome him back. thanks again for his 36 years o dedicated service to the nation and his willingness to serve asm the chairman of the joint chiefs of staff. as we know from those decades of service, general dempsey is an exceptionally well qualified american soldier and leader.al we we were reminded of the last hearing, hell is also a proud we we husband, father and grandfathero huand,l dempsey, will you remain grateful for the sacrifices that you and your family have made over the years, for the devotion of your beloved wife and the military se
in the tribal regions of yemen, but in the foxtrot and pakistan and also in parts of north africa. and in somalia. ultimately, the nctc's mission is to stop another terrorist attack and if i may just say that the leadership of mike leiter and an acting capacity of andrew lieb and i think nctc has played a vital role but it is a team approach and we face a challenging at times as we ever have. >> are you confident that we have the ability to get no work across the agencies as you obviously to coordinate and integrate all of that analyses? do you think we have got it? >> i think we have made a lot of progress. i do think as this committee and this report on the abdulmutallab attack of december 25, 2008 demonstrated, -- or 2009 that we have, we still face challenges and particularly i reviewed the vice chairman's and senator burmex's separate opinion which was quite critical and appropriate so i think it certainly of nctc. senator if i may say, think the greatest challenge facing nctc is the greatest strength that it brings together analysts, planners and other professionals to bring
pakistan's failure to act against militant extremists like the network in the north, the afghan taliban and other militant extremists. we will be interested in hearing general dempsey's thoughts on how to get the pakistan military to go after terrorist groups finding sanctuary in pakistan's tribal regions. al qaeda and the arabian peninsula in yemen and al qaeda elements in somalia continue to take advantage of failing and failed states to train their operatives and to plan attacks against the united states and our interests. it is critical that we don't apply significant pressure to these terrorist organizations, and to work with governments and international organizations in the region to address the long term problems. iran remains probably the greatest risk to world peace and to regional stability. we share the concerns of many nations about iran's continued support of terrorist activities beyond its borders, development of its missile programs, and refusal to cooperate with the international atomic energy commission. while we've seen evidence that the international sanctions has pu
and associated groups outside of afghanistan, pakistan and iraq. director leon panetta expressed concerns on the shifting to other places most notably in yemen, somalia, north africa, and i hope he will address what you see as the appropriate role for the special operation forces in those areas. in announcing lieutenant general allan's nomination, president obama called him, quote, the flight commander to take over the vital mission in afghanistan. if confirmed, the general will have big boots to fill and succeeding general petraeus commander of the 49 member international security assistance force coalition and u.s. forces afghanistan. like general petraeus, general allen brings an in-depth understanding of the complexities of the counterinsurgency effort based on his own experience as the commander in anbar province in iraq. working with the sunni awakening the marines and anbar succeeded in getting local sunni tribal leaders to reject the insurgency and instead support the iraqi government and its the deputy commander at u.s. central command general ellen has developed a regional persp
frankly operates a bit like the military in pakistan. it is a state within a state. they have their own economy and they had their own businesses and their revolution as it exists in egypt, the uprising as it exists, whatever you want to call it, has not yet focused on what will be that future role of this pebble in the room. the floor is open. yes. direct your question to somebody. push it up on the side, i think. [inaudible] the question is about yemen. when we talk about the arab spring and the uprising -- i would also like to hear little bit more about georgia. that seemed to be a key in the region. >> margot and david white at you say something about jordan and yemen. why would you start on yemen, the uprising of the yemen that has been going on for about a decade. and it has involved people from south yemen that are not too happy about the union of the two yemen's and the short end of the stick that they got. its minorities in the north near the saudi border that have had a revolution going on for several years and the tribal disputes. so there has been a long-standing conflict. d
efforts with pakistan. currently the u.k. is the second-largest of the foreign military force in afghanistan. from london, this is just under an hour. >> thank you, mr. speaker. with permission i would like to make a statement on afghanistan. formerly i said this government has sought to take a more hard hit security based approach to the mission.vernment as i've said, we are not there to build a perfect democracy, still a model society.re yes, we will help with the detablishment of demographicild institutions and yes, we can improve infrastructure, develop education, encourage democrac development, but we are in afghanistan. we can improve infrastructure, develop education and encourage development the we are in afghanistan for one overriding reason, to shore our own national security by helping the afghans take control of theirs. that means building up security forces to drive down british combat forces where the afghans themselves able to prevent al qaeda from returning and posing a threat to us and our allies around the world. this is poignant today on a plot executed by a
uranium in south africa, but pakistan has always been this focused and there's a reason it's the most dangerous place on earth it's the fifth largest nuclear power and 110 nuclear weapons it's estimated they have more terrorist groups per square mile than any other place you can find in that region as you might suspect from the fact binh two -- bin laden had been there a number of years and the security service, the isi come has close ties to the former current and the velte fund and start the taliban back in afghanistan and they started the ltte. the people would give the attacks in india as a counterweight to the military power. all those groups of operational connections now and the experts would be and are inclined to plan operations against the west both at home and abroad, so the question becomes then how vulnerable is the pakistani arsenal and how much would someone get a nuclear complex there's several ways. you could of the clandestine sale of materials which a.q., the father of the program for a number of years you could have a rogue officer take over the nuclear installatio
was given to her by the president of pakistan when she made a trip there in 1962. she made a semiofficial trip you might recall to pakistan and india and she was a huge hit. she loved this horse and many photographs you see of her from that time and her time in the white house and on her farm that she ranted and built a farm house right at the end of the presidency in northern virginia so often times when you see her writing she is writing this horse that the pakistani president gave to her. she had thrown for him an amazing state dinner in the springtime and early summer of 1961 at mt. vernon. in fact she had everyone meet and catch a boat to go down the potomac river take an evening cruise and arrive at mount vernon and had beautiful marquees set up at mount vernon and had a beautiful outdoor lovely dinner with music for the president of pakistan and all those invited to state dinners. it still sets the upper bar for amazing state dinners that jacqueline kennedy had. this political symbolism i want to say something about. it taps into emotional and moral and psychological feeling. if ja
africa. that pakistan has always been his focus, and there's a reason it's the most dangerous place on earth. it's the fifth largest nuclear power. up to 100 nuclear weapons. it's estimated they have more terrorist groups for square-mile and in a place you can find in that region. as we might suspect from the fact that bin laden had the planes fly for years, their security service, the isi has close ties to former current jihadists. they help to find and the taliban to fight the russians. back in afghanistan. they fought and started the people he did the mumbai attacks in india. as a counterweight to india military power. all those groups have operational connections to each other now. the experts believe that they would be, and are inclined to plan operations against the west, both at home and abroad. so the question becomes then how vulnerable is the pakistani arsenal? how might someone need a nuclear bomb? there's several ways. you could have a rogue officer come you have a clandestine sale of materials which a.q. khan, the father of the nuclear program of pakistan before a numbe
reasons we are involved in afghanistan to begin with has to be keeping an eye up close on the pakistan nuclear stockpile and to make absolutely sure terrorist to not get their hands on them. that is the underlying theme and message when obama first came into came up with the idea that you have to see the two of them together and could not separate the two. what the president is doing right now in his speech is almost make a move toward separation. >> are we almost ready to go to questions? who has a microphone? >> bernie had the microphone [laughter] >> we have the microphone. i'm inclined to say some time it said it is difficult to get the first person to ask a question selects skip the first question going right to the second question. microphones? >> i have a question. 20/20 hindsight you feel the be a non more was a complete mistake are we making that now and afghanistan? not learning the lessons of the past? >> today is friday seto on money wednesday friday i answer that with acs but on weekends i am not sure. [laughter] the fact is i really am not sure. i study this the way the p
is that al qaeda was traditionally in pakistan. we see franchise operationsrance popping a binyamin. also in somalia. then you have this on run, anyou component. in many respects the threat isnt more complex and more drivers because on september 11 al qaeda was like a fortune 500 company with c-span.org as the ceo. now it's much more like a franchise operation. i know senses that the three areas the u.s. intelligence community is achaean very hard,. number one, the pipeline beforet his death, number two, home runs the purcell's uses that as justification to launch attackse as we get toward the tenthet clo anniversary. will these affiliate's kind of step up to fill a void? so i don't think it is as simpl1 as we pull them troops from one area and bring it into the united states. mak unfortunately, relief facing very tough challenges. percy just outlined three big concerns.riti take us through the translation of what that mightes h mean.n fo what other concerns about places that could be a test of tolerable positions, how do you prepare if quality said, it passively services. >> guest: last
of operations concerns about overreliance and sometimes tenuous surface lines of communication through pakistan for logistic support into afghanistan have fled over the past couple years the establishment of the northern distribution network through central asia. however, these northerners may need to be expanded to allow increased movement into an increasingly out of afghanistan that we are to maintain the quality and timeliness of that support to our afghanistan forces people be interested do hear general fraser's views on that. and again, our deepest thanks to you and your families for all the hue of done will do for the nation in the days ahead. senator mccain. >> thank you, mr. chairman. i woke on general odierno, admiral winnefeld, fraser a special thanks to their families and congratulate them on their nominations. i particularly want to recognize mr. tony odierno at, a distinguished wounded warrior and his hearer supporting his father. general odierno, i strongly support your rep nomination to the net chief of staff of the army. her critical role in iraq and a note you are one of the ve
to ensure civilians in pakistan would not be hit a unmanned drones the united states was using get the taliban and al qaeda. tonight new evidence that this confidence is simply wrong. is part of this to do with a chill in relations between pakistan and washington? >> it is indeed of course. of course. desai's been a secret war as you like conducted by the cia in pakistan using these unmanned aircraft. if one looks at the history of it, one can see how it is ramped up but now there are questions in the wake -- of course the vast majority of these raids have been carried out in so-called tribal areas on the border with afghanistan, and over the years the number has gone up steadily. in the first few years in the strikes of 2,042,007 they're just a handful and then we see it going up in 2010. the obama administration rising at a policy never fully publicly articulated. 118 strikes last year and 45 so far this year. the pakistanis said a couple of months ago that they wanted him stopped them stopped and they ordered the cia out in their base in pakistan were some of the strikes are bei
of 9/11 is a period of heightened threat. despite counterterrorism pressure against pakistan including the successful strike against osama bin laden the growth remains dangerous and vengeful. at the same time the threat from al qaeda's affiliate's and adherents around the world has increased and presents particular challenges. i am especially concerned about the threat to the united states homeland from al qaeda in the air arabian peninsula, aqap as we cut, as well as terrorist safe havens in somalia and elsewhere. this means, at least to me, that this is a crucial time for our counterterrorism establishment to be at full strength and not to be without the leader. nctc is a linchpin of this establishment. so i treat least the president has moved quickly to nominate mr. olsen, an individual serving in a senior intelligence community position today to take the helm of this organization. let me take just a moment to read the first paragraph from a letter of support from mr. olsen's nomination written by general keith alexander, that richter of the national security agency. this is a quote
perhaps the most important conflicts of the world today. elisa is currently in pakistan where she is kind of tied down by advance. they're as a journalist and is being advised not to move for obvious reasons. so we salute her an absence and invite her editor. come on up and get the award on her behalf. [applause] [applause] >> thank you, and thank you to the sponsor of the award. eliza is in pakistan. and if i know her she is somehow chasing the story. the aftermath is something that will have an effect on the ground there. if anyone can get the story, eliza griswold can. the book that we -- she gave the subtitle dispatches from the fall line between christianity and islam as the title "the tenth parallel" for the line that she followed in the book, but it could just as well have had the title common ground. the drama that she is working out of the book is very similar to the one that is worked out in the classic book. people of very different beliefs with similar geographic space. religious strife in israel and grim, but the long history of every day encounters of believers of different
and pakistan over the past year, counterterrorism efforts in yemen must be a central focus of our national security strategy. that said, our -- closely in line with political, economic and developmental challenges as well. those challenges are those that the united states must work to address as part of a holistic approach to this challenge. first of all, just outlined three. three priorities. first, we need a better understanding of the political opposition and prospects for democratic reform. acting president, the vice president in yemen, as only a small power base in the opposition appears fractured between the so-called joint meeting parties, jmp. and other individuals such as the former commander of the first armored division and check out omar, leader of the powerful fellow. over the weekend elements of the opposition asked the formation of a shadow government to the composition and support, i should say though the -- for those the composition and support for the group remains unclear. it is clear however that the transition process will take place sooner or later. the president has
, we guessed, that hamid karzai is involved in corrupt links to criminal war lords and that pakistan's playing both sides in all of that. and, sure, these, this information is embarrassing to our government and, certainly, to other governments like the former dictator of tunisia who the wikileaks, this state department cable showed that he was operating a column tock rah si in tunisia, and he was chased out of office in the first arab spring revolution. um, the embarrassing information to many governments, but isn't this kind of information that informed americans ought to be entitled to know? and whether any disclosure actually caused harm has to be relevant to any prosecution. no harm ever subtle r resulted -- resulted from the publication of the pentagon papers. none. despite the government's property stations at the time -- protestations at the time that we'd be in serious national security difficulty if information came out, and the government has not yet identified any specific harm from the wikileaks disclosures. assange has, of course, been busy trying to fight extradition to
that as al qaeda leadership in pakistan comes under pressure, that it is not able to be defined as a safe haven in somalia. since the fall of the mass -- the last national government in 1991, somaliland both the autonomous areas of somalia, have been the only areas with effective governance. somali man seeks international recognition while it truly does not. the question of whether the united states and international committee for the recognizing somaliland or support it integration into greater somalia at some future point requires ongoing an examination and discussion. consequently, today's hearing offers a viable opportunity to examine u.s. policy on a variety of issues involving somali. now i return to ranking member, mr. payne, for comments he might have. >> thank you very much. i would like to thank you and mr. royce for calling this very important joint hearing on assessing the consequences of the failed state of somalia. and it's a pleasure to see my good friend, mr. royce, acting chair the african subcommittee at some point in the past and has maintained a strong interest as has
, pakistan or egypt. and the two questions that i have, how many connections have there been -- convictions have there been over the last several years, do you have any -- and how many occasions do you know where the american embassy has advocated for these cases? generally, when there's a problem, members go to the embassy, they advocate it. how many times has the american embassy participate and been involved in any different cases? >> thank you very much, mr. wolf. there have been, in the 50 cases i was involved with personally, there were two investigations, neither investigation resulted in any legal process, so there are no convictions, um, resulting as of, as of complaints to the effective kidnappings, forced marriages and forced converses of coptic christian women. to my knowledge, also, and according to my research the u.s. embassy has not advocated on behalf of these women. >> one last thing, mr. chairman. as you have this record, i urge you to send it to leon panetta. our military has a very good relationship, in fact, as i think our military has a better relationship and more cl
or afghanistan to prevent pakistan from continuing to fail, the idea of the two-stage solution for israel and palestine or all within the concept of the system and if we don't have strong response things are going in the wrong direction. >> host: what i see on the ground and a travel to afghanistan is to be honest with all the power of the u.s. military you have an incredibly confident will lead military. in the and that's not enough to substitute for the government's of the afghan states and institutions provide and and pushing we just never quite get there. it's hard to find anybody -- >> guest: that's true, too. this brings us back to something like democratization and the culture in their view is going to be something where the people will have a way if you change those that are going to run their government. this is something you can't avoid. when the figures for you don't put other dictators in you can put into place the basic institutions and procedures. >> host: he turned back from these issues in the news of the intellectual argument that the core of your book which is a very cha
or iran today or afghanistan to prevent pakistan from beginning to sell the idea of a two-state solution and they're all within this september of an international state system and we're going in the wrong direction. >> what i see on the ground and i travel often to afghanistan is to be honest with all the power of the u.s. military, you have an incredibly competent military but in the end that's not enough to substitute for the poor governance that the afghanistan paid and the institutions provide. and so we're pushing businesses to walk uphill and we never get there and i'm sure you -- it's hard to find anybody to defend president karzai's governance. >> that's true, too. but good governance brings us back to something like the democratization, something like that procedure and it's going to be their own culture -- but it's going to be something the people will have a way to control, to change those who are going to run their governments. and this is something you can't avoid. when the dictators fall, you have put in place the basic institutions and procedures for getting responsive gov
and in pakistan, we actually had heard he was there may be a couple years before, but you really have to fine-tune and continue to look for information that collaborates the story people are telling you. so you have a high chance that in fact that does happen so that if you send troops in you are going after osama bin laden or you are going in to get jessica lynch. >> guest: as a part of the information we were to pull from the fly over in the city indicated that she was in the city, so we were a part of the collaborative effort, and actually i think that is one of the shining moments that there were a lot. they were able to look at this imagery and analyze and see things i couldn't understand how they were seeing that, but they did a phenomenal job and thanks to them they saved so many lives on both sides really it's a very great effort that led to just a huge success for the marines. >> host: you and i had other things in common. your mother is puerto ricans in your part latina. do you know spanish? i don't even know if you do. >> guest: unfortunately not. a great and there is not on my mot
conflicts in the world today. a life that is currently in pakistan, where she is tied down by events and there is a journalist being advised not to move for obvious reasons. and we salute her in assets and nature editor and teacher award on her behalf. [applause] >> thank you, nick and thank you to be a sponsor of the award of the journalism school. i know i am somehow in that story, even if the aftermath of the killing of the modern is something that will have effect on the ground there and anyone can get that story if griswold can. the book that she gave this a title dispatches from the fault line between christianity and islam has the title of the 10th parallel, the line that as she followed the book, could just as well have the title common ground because the drama is working under the work is similar to the one regarding this classic book. it is a code of different beliefs to the similar geographic space. he lives tries to make this point i tend to book for christians and muslims need, but the long history of everyday encounter of levers of different kinds, shouldering all thing
, to prevent pakistan from continuing to fail. the idea of a two-state solution for israel and palestine, and they are all within the concept of this international state. that is, we don't have strong response of state. things are going in the wrong direction. >> host: what i see on the ground, and i travel often to afghanistan, is to be honest, with all the power of the u.s. military, we have an incredibly confident and well led military. in the and that's not enough to substitute for the governance that the afghans and institutions provide. and so it's like, you know, pushing a rock up a hill. we just never quite get there. i'm sure you wouldn't disagree. it's hard to find anybody, -- >> guest: that is true. but good governance brings us back to something like democratization. something like that procedure and it's going to be their own culture that will sort of be a jerk to interview. but ill be something that people have a way to control and to change those are going to run their government. and this is something you can't avoid when the dictators flow, you don't put on the dictators
into pakistan is causing a huge number of attacks there. and so what's been occurring is not just a large number of suicide attacks but a large number of anti-american-inspired suicide attacks. >> so besides the obvious policy of pulling out, is there another policy? >> absolutely. >> to prevent this. >> because pulling out, simply abandons our interests, ignores our interests. what this book suggests is a middle ground policy called offshore balancing. offshore balancing continues to pursue our core security interests and obligations in overseas regions but does so with over the horizon, naval power, intelligence assets, relies on economic assets and political tools and this is the core policy that we pursue as the united states for decades in major regions of the world, such as the middle east with great success, and we should return to this policy. >> can you give us specifics about how we should pursue the policy in the middle east. >> in the 1970s and '80s, the united states had core interests in the middle east including the persian gulf and we maintained and secured those interests withou
, whether with iraq or iraq today or afghanistan to prevent pakistan from continuing to sell the idea of a two-state solution for israel and palestine are all within the concept of the international space system. that is, we don't have strong systems and things are going in the wrong direction. >> host: what i see on the ground when i travel often to afghanistan is to be honest with all the power of the u.s. military, we have an up credibly well-led military, but in the end that's not enough to substitute for the poor government there is and the institutions provide, and it's like, you know, we're pushing this rock uphill and we just never quite get there. i'm sure you wouldn't disagree and it's hard to find anybody to defend president karzai's government. >> guest: that's true too. it brings us back to democratization and that procedure and it will be their own culture, but it's going to be something where the people will have a way to control, change those who are going to run their government, and this is something you can't avoid. when the dictators form and dictatorships are in p
is familiar with them now because they are used in pakistan, but they began as espionage platforms that only carried cameras. they were used in the bos kneian conflict, and they were not interesting to many people other than the cia, but right around the late 90s, this unknown terrorist named bin laden appeared on the scene, and the cia were considering assassinating him with a drone, and the way they would do it is attach missiles to the drone, and this was a radical idea, so they got together, the cia and the air force, and they decided to engineer these hell-fire missiles, the missiles are so accurate that the hell fire comes from fire and forget. you push it and forget. first, they had to test it out there, and the president's concern at the time is while the character is known to do falcon hunting with middle eastern royal faps, and what is somebody is important at the compound when we attack him with this predator drone carrying a hell fire missile we haven't used yet, so they built a mockup of bin laden's afghanistan farm, and that's where they practiced how to possibly assassinate hi
. we had the times square bomber inspired by them and had trained with the taliban in pakistan. yes, there are broader links but there are a few things at work here. number 1 a crippling political correctness, absolutely crippling. i think another thing, quite frankly, is that it's very difficult -- say that islam is not a religion of peace. say shari'a is a threat, that's a very difficult thing to come to grips with because that means you're at good with a good slice of the muslim population who does follow muslim fundamentally. who does follow shari'a to the t. that's a scary thing to admit for our government. >> host: and i want to go back to that because no less a person than george bush right after 9/11 said islam is a religion of peace. right after the young comes vo radical muslim walked into the airport in frankfurt and shot a couple of american soldiers, barack obama said one of the islam is one of the world's great religions. my sense we want to believe that because we are a tolerant people. but you've got quotes in this book from several known terrorists and conspirators
-z. pages are scattered pakistan certainly as he was going along most of it was in his own hand, at least for the first dictionary. but i think for the second dictionary when his over aei think other people, he uses described or other people help them with the writing. >> you suggested that his obsessions and compulsions might have been hard on his family. was there any particular evidence of that? >> yes, he had a son, he had one son and six daughters. and his son never come his son was very bright and he studied classics at el but he never graduated. his letters are kind of sad. he was depressed. and he worked on the dictionary but because he didn't have a college degree he could never become if full long after. and i have since been noah webster's son was very difficult. his wife was, his wife kept an orderly house. a perfect fit for him, and she didn't complain but he had a sense that she was doing everything that she wanted, and it must've taken a toll on her, even if she doesn't talk about it explicitly in the letters. there's a sense he was very demanding but there's also letters t
information or mothers. that is what we try to do. when we went over -- after osama bin laden in pakistan. we actually had her heard that he was there maybe a couple of years before but you really have to fine-tune and continue to look for information that collaborates the story that people are telling you so you have a high chance that in fact, that does happen there, right? so if you send troops and you are really going after osama bin laden or going into gets jessica lynch. >> guest: exactly. they indicated she was in the city so we were part of a collaborative effort. it resulted in her rescue. you know, and actually i think that is i think one of the shining moments. my marines were spectacular and we were able to look at it and analyze it and see things that i could not have understood. they just did a phenomenal job and thanks to them, like they really saved so many lives on both sides really. it was their great effort that led to just a huge success for the marines. >> host: i have some other things to comment on. your mother is puerto rican so you are part latina if you will. do you
, a secular jewish woman from new york who, in 1962, moved to pakistan and converted converted to islam. >> welcome to the 27 annual chicago tribune printer's row late fest, a special thank youal to our sponsors. row before we begin today's programr please turn off your cell phone and all other electric devices. and photographs are not permitted. today's program will be recorded for future broadcast and c-span. is book tv.m wile if there is time at the end for a q&a session with the author we
after osama bin laden and pakistan, we actually had heard that he was there may be a couple years before, but you have to fine-tune and continue to look for information that collaborates the story people are telling you, so you have a high chance that in fact that does happen there, so if you send troops in you are really going after osama bin laden or going in to get jessica lynch. >> guest: exactly. part of the information we were able to pull from the fly over in the city indicated that she was in the city so we were part of the collaborative effort that resulted in her rescue. you know, and actually i think that is i think one of the shining moments of our sergeant but the marines were spectacular and able to look at this imagery and analyze it and see things i couldn't understand how they were seeing but they did a phenomenal job in coming you know, thanks to them and they really saved so many lives on both sides really it was there who great effort that led to huge success for the marines. >> host: you and i have other things in common. if your mother is puerto rican so you are par
interests or an authorization debate in the congress. given all that is at stake in pakistan, afghanistan, iran, saudi arabia, egypt, syria, yemen and elsewhere in the islamic world, a rational strategic assessment would not devote sizable american military and economic resources to a civil war in libya. it is an expensive diversion that leaves the united states and our european allies with fewer assets to respond to other contingencies. under the constitution, it is our responseability to determine whether we should be a party to libya's civil war. as a part of this process we will consider the terms and scope of the joint resolution before us today. i'm concerned this resolution would provide broad authorities, permitting significant expansion of the united states military involvement in libya's civil war. the resolution would authorize the president to reescalate united states military involvement in libya, to and potentially beyond the lead role it played at the beginning of the operation when the united states carried out intensive airstrikes on a daily basis. the resolution would on
to go to for jihadists and afghanistan, iran, excuse me, afghanistan, iraq, pakistan or yemen but as many as two dozen muslim americans and al-shabaab with many cases trained by al qaeda leaders remain unaccounted for. the committee has found that all chabad related federal prosecutions for funding, recruiting and attempting to join al-shabaab are the largest number and most significant upward trend in the terror cases filed for the justice department over the past two years. least 38 cases have been unsealed since 2009. minnesota, ohio, california, new jersey, new york, illinois, alabama, virginia and texas three al-shabaab is recruiting inside american mosques and disalle communities like minneapolis and san diego. according to the justice department. this month and also of recruiter pleaded guilty to a recording a large group of muslims from minneapolis at mosques and without any known protest moscow's leaders. a top also leader in somalia supervised this recruiting. one minnesota recruited was a suicide bomber whose 2008 attack on northern somalia send shock waves of alarm
persecuted because they are christians, whether it be in afghanistan, whether it be in pakistan or in the egypt and all over, the two questions that i have. how many convictions have there been over the last several years? and how many occasions do you know where the american embassy has advocated for these cases? because generally been there is a problem for the members go to the and become the advocate for how many convictions do you know have been cases brought in the egyptian courts and how many times has the american embassy participated and been involved in any different case? >> thank you very much, mr. wolfe. there has been in the 50 cases of i was involved with personally, there were two investigations. meter investigation resulted in any legal process. so there are no convictions resulting as the complaints to the effect of kidnapping forced marriages and forced conversions of coptic christian women. to my knowledge also and according to my research, the u.s. embassy has not advocated on behalf of these women. >> one nice thing, mr. chairman, as you have the record i u
, for example, when we went after ow sam ma bin laden -- osama bin laden in pakistan, we actually had heard he was there maybe a couple years before, but you really have to fine tune and continue to look for information that corroborates the story that people are telling you so you have a high chance that, in fact, that does happen there, right? so if you send troops in, you're really going after an osama bin laden, or you're really going in to get jessica lynch. >> guest: exactly. part of the information pulled from our flyovers of the city indicated that she was in the city, so we were part of the collaborative effort that resulted in her rescue. you know, and, actually, i think that is, i think, one of the shining moments of our squadron did, but a lot of -- my marines were spectacular. they were able to look at this imagery, analyze it and see things that i couldn't understand in that. but they just did a phenomenal job. and, you know, thanks to them they really saved so many lives on both sides, really. the their great effort that led to, you know, just huge success for the marines. >> ho
to pakistan? and afghanistan? why send all of that money over there? get our troops out of all of these other countries that we need them in. germany and philippines and all of the other places anymore. >> host: here's leslie -- excuse me, tammy in leslie, kentucky. >> caller: yes, they need to bring our troops home and stop spending the millions of billions. they need to help out the people on social security. it's hard to make it especially when you have a family. >> host: florida, linda on the independent line. where do things stand with the debt and deficit negotiations? >> caller: i think personally it's all bull crap. you've got people that is -- has been on the social security because they are either disabled or whatever. bring our troops home. we don't need to support pakistan. look what they did to us, we don't need to support iran. bring us home. get us out of that situation. we have people out here that fought for the country. now they are going to suffer because he wants to cut back the social security, medicare, and medicaid? that's nuts. i think just bring our people home. start
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 62 (some duplicates have been removed)